Skip to content

Affordable Alaska

Looking for things to do in alyeska all year round?

Sign up for insider tips, itineraries, news, and deals!

Around Alyeska Resort:

  • Ride the scenic tram to the top of Mt. Alyeska and visit the Roundhouse Museum (free admission). Pack a picnic lunch and enjoy incredible views of the surrounding mountains and the Turnagain Arm from the observation deck.
  • Take a hike on one of the many trails that start right from the hotel. Journey up the new North Face Trail for amazing views and catch a free tram ride down.
  • Rent bikes and tour the valley along the paved Girdwood Bike Path. For the adventurous, take the Bike Path out to Seward Highway and continue onto the Bird Point Trail for amazing vistas along the Turnagain Arm. Mountain bikers will find a variety of cross-country and freeride trails that start right from The Hotel Alyeska.
  • Drive the scenic Seward Highway and stop along the interpretative rest stops. Check the tide reports and visit Bird Point to view the unique Bore Tide.
  • Visit historic Crow Creek Mine and try your luck at gold panning, or just take a walking tour of the beautiful grounds filled with antiques and flower beds.

In the Surrounding Areas:

  • Visit the educational and hands-on Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center to see native Alaskan wildlife including moose, brown bears, caribou, bison, musk ox and many more. Located just nine miles south of the resort.
  • Visit the Alaska’s largest open air market offering a variety of local items including Alaska-grown produce, fresh seafood, food vendors, and Alaskan-made crafts and gifts. Saturdays and Sundays in downtown Anchorage on 3rd and E. Street (free admission, summer season only).
  • Take a cultural adventure in Anchorage with visits to the Anchorage Museum, Alaska Native Arts Foundation Gallery (free admission) and Alaska Native Heritage Center. Take advantage of the Alaska Culture Pass and save 30% off admission to both the Anchorage Museum and Alaska Native Heritage Center.
  • Visit the Alaska Sea Life Center in Seward. The center is Alaska’s only public aquarium and an active research facility. Interpretative programs and displays are available, plus viewing of sea lions, puffins, star fish and much more.

 

See current deals and offers!

While on the slopes, you will see people using alpine skis, telemark skis, snowboards, and other snow play equipment such as snow skates, snow bikes and adaptive ski gear. You will see skiers of all levels – from beginners enjoying their first day on the slopes to expert skiers with years of experience. It is always your responsibility, regardless of the equipment used or the level of skier that you are, to be courteous to others and to be aware that skiing safely makes the ski slopes safer for all of us.

Alyeska is a large mountain with difficult and dangerous terrain and skiing and riding are dangerous sports.  We do our best to inform guests of the possible hazards associated with snow sports. We do our best to mark hazards and dangerous terrain appropriately. We also actively open and close certain areas of the mountain often due to Snow Safety considerations, ski conditions, or darkness

Our beginner ski zones and high skier traffic areas are important to us and we refer to these areas as “Slow” zones. We label them as such on our trail maps and with signs and banners as you ski through each of these areas. We encourage guests to ‘Go with the Flow’ in these areas, ski only as fast as the skier next to you. Our least favorite part of the job is to be the police on the mountain. We do our best to keep an eye on people skiing around to ensure everyone is skiing safely and within their limits.

Alyeska has set Enforcement Guidelines based on the Skier Responsibility Code and Mountain Safety Concerns for behavior on the mountain. When an individual crosses these lines, we have to step in and be the police, and we have no tolerance for unsafe behavior at Alyeska. We have a relationship with the Department of Natural Resources and due to this relationship we issue DNR citations to individuals in violations of certain rules. In addition to loss of lift privileges and fines we also require all ‘violators’ to take the Mountain Education Test, a tool used to help educate.